[eh?97]L. Eugene Methe and Megan Siebe
Revisited, Revisited, Revisited
[eh?96]Felipe Araya
Punata
[eh?95]Eoin Callery
Oakum
[eh?94]noisepoetnobody
Fissure
[eh?93]Bad Jazz
Daymare
[eh?92]Ernesto Diaz-Infante
My Benign Swords
[eh?91]Larnie Fox
In The Cathedral of Airplanes
[eh?90]Tom Djll
Cassette19
[eh?89]Leonard * Day * Jerman
Isinglass
[eh?88]Das Torpedoes
Qu Nar
[eh?87]Ben Bennett & John Collins McCormick
Pluperfect
[eh?86]Daniel Wyche
Our Severed Sleep
[eh?85]Seeded Plain
Spill Containment
[eh?84]Bad Jazz
Bad Dreams In The Night
[eh?83]Chefkirk & Andrew Quitter
Kaiju Manifestos
[eh?82]Venison Whirled
Tetragrammatones
[eh?81]Gary Rouzer
Studies and Observations of Domestic Shrubbery
[eh?80]Unrepeatable Quartet
Edmonton 2012
[eh?79]Stefan Roigk
Unpredictable
[eh?78]Lucky Bone
Borderline
[eh?77]Jeffrey Alexander
No Sacred Snow, No Sacred Show
[eh?76]Bruno Duplant / Pedro Chambel / Fergus Kelly
(Winter Pale) Red Sun
[eh?75]Horaflora
Live
[eh?74]Graves / Kreimer / Wilsey / Bachmann
The July Amalgam
[eh?73]Sky Thing
Virgin Journalist
[eh?72]Cactus Truck
Live in USA
[eh?71]Various Artists
Hammer, Anvil, Stirrup
[eh?70]Alice Hui-Sheng Chang, Park Seungjun and Jin Sangtae
Live at Dotolim
[eh?69]Edward Ricart & Tim Daisy
Yiu Ja Ley
[eh?68]Chagas And Schafer
Gesture To The Declining Sun
[eh?67]Superlith
Plasma Clusters
[eh?66]Jeff Kaiser / Nicolas Deyoe
Chimney Liquor
[eh?65]Close Embrace of the Earth
At the Spirits Rejoice Festival
[eh?64]Jean-Marc Montera & Francesco Calandrino
Idi Di Marzo
[eh?63]Un Nu
Recoupements
[eh?62]Bailly / Millevoi / Moffett
Strange Falls
[eh?61]Jacob Felix Heule & Bryce Beverlin II
Intersects
[eh?60]Foust!
Space Sickness
[eh?59]Dislocation
Mud Layer Cake
[eh?58]Strongly Imploded
Twilight of Broken Machines
[eh?57]CHEFKIRK
we must leave the warren
[eh?56]Hag
Moist Areas
[eh?55]Eloine & Sabrina Siegel
Nature's Recomposition 33
[eh?54]KBD(uo)
Any Port In A Storm
[eh?53]Eckhard Gerdes
!Evil Scuff Mud
[eh?52]Psychotic Quartet
Sphaleron
[eh?51]Federico Barabino
Can You Listen To the Silence Between the Notes?
[eh?50]Soaf
Dynammo
[eh?49]Yana
The Fruit Witch of Ancient Salamander
[eh?48]Ember Schrag
Jephthah's Daughter
[eh?47]Massimo Falascone / Bob Marsh
Non Troppo Lontano
[eh?46]Delplanque / Oldman
Chapelle de l'Oratoire
[eh?45]The Epicureans
A Riddle Within a Conundrum Within a Game
[eh?44]Croatan Ensemble
Without
[eh?43]Man's Last Great Invention
None.
[eh?42]Sad Sailor
Link to the Outside World
[eh?41]Ricardo Arias / Miguel Frasconi / Keiko Uenishi
Object
[eh?40]Andreas Brandal
This Is Not For You
[eh?39]Gamma Goat
Beard of Sound, Beard of Sand
[eh?38]John Dikeman / Jon Barrios / Toshi Makihara
We Need You
[eh?37]David Moscovich
Ass Lunch
[eh?36]KBD
Four Plus One
[eh?35]Brekekekexkoaxkoax
I Manage To Get Out by a Secret Door
[eh?34]Diamondhead
Dirty Realism
[eh?33]Jesse Krakow
World Without Nachos
[eh?31]DBH
Wave the Old Wave
[eh?30]Bryan Day
Four Televisions
[eh?29]Giraffe
Hear Here
[eh?28]Nagaoag
Yama Labam A
[eh?27]Shelf Life
Rheuma
[eh?26]Papier Mache
2
[eh?25]Papier Mache
1


Jean-Marc Montera & Francesco Calandrino - Idi Di Marzo
CD-R (Marseille, France & Alcamo, Italy)



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Jean-Marc Montera - Electric Guitar, FX
Francesco Calandrino - Lo-fi Stereos, Manipulated Audiocassettes, Field Recordings, Clarinet

Reviews:
(Sound Projector) I can’t believe I never heard of Jean-Marc Montera before. He’s a prominent French avant improvising guitarist who’s been active since 1978 and was co-founder of the Groupe de Recherche en Improvisation Musicale (GRIM), and besides all of his film soundtrack work is a hero of European festivals and has worked in many groups. Most of his discography comes from the 1990s, and after hearing his music on Idi Di Marzo (PUBLIC EYESORE EH?64) I am tempted to start scouring for some of those released obscurities…on this album, he’s picked up his effects-laden electric guitar and teamed up with Francesco Calandrino, a talented young Italian fellow who glories in the mistakes and improbable sound events that can be wrought from his set-up of stereo players, cassette tapes, and field recordings. On these 2009 recordings made in Palermo, the duo create a deliciously glutinous effect of sticky, honeyfied sound that a fat bumblebee like myself can easily get trapped in for many an hour of recreational listening. It’s a lovely, rich, continuous slew of rough-edged noise, packed with plenty of variances and little boxes of surprises, and never content to drone foolishly like a salamander trapped in its own slimy sandpit. Montera rocks! He’s packing a lot of the sort of frisson and energy we used to hear from Keith Rowe, never afraid to let those humbucking pickups hum as much as they please, and weaving many heavy, clanging phrases of lead-lined guitar work. He can ride his amp feedback like any expert surfer dude, but he’s also wringing some wayward solo phrases on occasion (check out the action on track 3) that fans of Fred Frith’s rubbery style will snap up like hot biscuits. Calandrino is likewise a musician who thankfully has not yet learned how to be earnest and self-important, and there’s a palpable sense of exploration in the way he flings his unexpected lo-fi cassette samples and music stabs around, coupled with an enviable dose of sheer fun. He’s a clarinettist, too. You may tune into this set one day and find you hear nothing but distorted wobbly murk, but for me today (baking in clammy sweaty heat) this play is “the goods”. I tell ya, between Montera and the “other” Jean-Marc (Foussat, that is), the French just rule noisy improvised music! - Ed Pinsent

(Monsieur Délire) French noise guitarist Jean-Marc Montera and Italian sound artist Francesco Calandrino (lo-fi stereo, cassettes, field recordings, clarinet), in one hour’s worth of dense and surprisingly powerful free improvisations. The second track includes some seriously haunting vocals. Lots of mysterious things and unexplained sonic additions happening here. Quite fascinating, despite the raw quality of the recording. - François Couture

(Kathodik) Che poi, di fondo che vuoi che sia. Stai bene oggi, schiatta domani. D'altronde; è la vita. Mi dirai. Se io dicessi: Un cazzo! Puozz' jetta' o' sang!? Cambia qualcosa? Nulla, tutto gira indifferente. A lungo e per molto, con la chitarra elettrica, a tracolla e sulle ginocchia, per terra, da sola e in compagnia, clarinetto, cassette manipolate e stereo di merda sollecitati. Agitarsi, in forma evidente e fisicamente percepibile. Gracchiare e ragliare, cortocircuitarsi ed immalinconirsi fra le corde, tanto nastro a contatto (trattato nel mezzo). La vita offre di meglio, ma è del buon tempo speso. Tra sudore ed aggrovigli, fotocopia audio di un odierno incespicante. Dico bello. Poiché bello. A giocar con i detriti. Metti insieme i cocci in un sacco, dentro sputa colla, agita, attendi il risultato, dattelo in faccia. Diabolicamente gagliardo. - Marco Carcasi

(Chain D.L.K.) According to the liner notes, Jean-Marc Montera is on Electric Guitar and FX, while Francesco Calandrino wields 'Lo-fi Stereos, Manipulated Audiocassettes, Field Recordings, Clarinet.' With this in mind, you have a pretty good idea of what you are in for. This one gets in your face right off the bat. Imagine, if you will, a typical album. Now take all of the tracks, separate them out, and throw it all into a blender. Add a healthy dose of feedback and you have 'Idi Di Marzo.' This is pretty good cut up noise and improvisation. It isn't quite as coherent as Negativland, but closer at times to Nurse With Wound's more cut up works in style or perhaps 'Redintegrate' by Hafler Trio. It isn't all completely in your face, though. In some parts, it is more of a noisy drone. If you like noisy improv, this will be up your alley. This album weighs in at around 58 minutes.

(Ampersand Etcetera) And then Jean-Marc Montera on guitar and fx and Francesco Calandrino on lofi stereos, manipulated audiocassettes, field recordings, clarinets recorded on 1 March and release on 'Idi Di Marzo' (Eh?64)(mysteriously as, as the Italian hints, Idi is ides). Their album together is quite a slippery beast though. The first track has scraping and rapidly played guitar over a protean bed of electronica that shifts and cuts like an audio whirlwind - buzzing crackling whining, samples emerging briefly, though a longer choir sings. Things get more restrained in the next track, with a hint of Calendro's clarinet which becomes more obvious on subsequent pieces, particularly track 4. As you listen your mind focusses on the electronica - the child's voice or the whooping in 3 perhaps - and then to the guitar which uses a range of tricks (scraping, percussive, treatments) and straight playing in varied styles. The balance between the 2, and the interplay, is well judged and satisfying. There is also a flow to the album - as it moves to the conclusion it passes through a noisy ragged track 5 with voice samples more prominent and then the more rocking conclusion of track 6. This is a driving album, which pulls you along and demands that you listen to it. After finishing the review I realised that the albums are perhaps more different - if I had kept it at 2 we would be fine with a tying together here. July Amalgam and Dotolim both have a quiet earnestness - I see these groups sitting playing with serious faces to a group of intense audience members, they work the silences and subtly modulate; while in Idi there is more excitement and extravagant drama. I am not a ranker: each of these albums works its field skilfully and is satisfying in their own way - either as ambience or as pummeling noise. - Jeremy Keens


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