[eh?109]Seeded Plain
Flying Falling
[eh?108]APR
The Furies Inside Me OST
[eh?107]Jaap Blonk
Joyous Junctures
[eh?106]Sindre Bjerga
Hesitation Marks
[eh?105]Patrick Shiroishi / Arturo Ibarra
LA Blues
[eh?104]Wolkokrots
Atomnye Deti
[eh?103]Seeded Plain
Buffets Close Suddenly
[eh?102]Tania Chen & Jon Leidecker
Live In Japan
[eh?101]Cookie Tongue
Orphan Arms
[eh?100]arc
monument 36
[eh?99]Bill Brovold
Superstar
[eh?98]LSJ
Misty Nights
[eh?97]L. Eugene Methe and Megan Siebe
Revisited, Revisited, Revisited
[eh?96]Felipe Araya
Punata
[eh?95]Eoin Callery
Oakum
[eh?94]noisepoetnobody
Fissure
[eh?93]Bad Jazz
Daymare
[eh?92]Ernesto Diaz-Infante
My Benign Swords
[eh?91]Larnie Fox
In The Cathedral of Airplanes
[eh?90]Tom Djll
Cassette19
[eh?89]Leonard * Day * Jerman
Isinglass
[eh?88]Das Torpedoes
Qu Nar
[eh?87]Ben Bennett & John Collins McCormick
Pluperfect
[eh?86]Daniel Wyche
Our Severed Sleep
[eh?85]Seeded Plain
Spill Containment
[eh?84]Bad Jazz
Bad Dreams In The Night
[eh?83]Chefkirk & Andrew Quitter
Kaiju Manifestos
[eh?82]Venison Whirled
Tetragrammatones
[eh?81]Gary Rouzer
Studies and Observations of Domestic Shrubbery
[eh?80]Unrepeatable Quartet
Edmonton 2012
[eh?79]Stefan Roigk
Unpredictable
[eh?78]Lucky Bone
Borderline
[eh?77]Jeffrey Alexander
No Sacred Snow, No Sacred Show
[eh?76]Bruno Duplant / Pedro Chambel / Fergus Kelly
(Winter Pale) Red Sun
[eh?75]Horaflora
Live
[eh?74]Graves / Kreimer / Wilsey / Bachmann
The July Amalgam
[eh?73]Sky Thing
Virgin Journalist
[eh?72]Cactus Truck
Live in USA
[eh?71]Various Artists
Hammer, Anvil, Stirrup
[eh?70]Alice Hui-Sheng Chang, Park Seungjun and Jin Sangtae
Live at Dotolim
[eh?69]Edward Ricart & Tim Daisy
Yiu Ja Ley
[eh?68]Chagas And Schafer
Gesture To The Declining Sun
[eh?67]Superlith
Plasma Clusters
[eh?66]Jeff Kaiser / Nicolas Deyoe
Chimney Liquor
[eh?65]Close Embrace of the Earth
At the Spirits Rejoice Festival
[eh?64]Jean-Marc Montera & Francesco Calandrino
Idi Di Marzo
[eh?63]Un Nu
Recoupements
[eh?62]Bailly / Millevoi / Moffett
Strange Falls
[eh?61]Jacob Felix Heule & Bryce Beverlin II
Intersects
[eh?60]Foust!
Space Sickness
[eh?59]Dislocation
Mud Layer Cake
[eh?58]Strongly Imploded
Twilight of Broken Machines
[eh?57]CHEFKIRK
we must leave the warren
[eh?56]Hag
Moist Areas
[eh?55]Eloine & Sabrina Siegel
Nature's Recomposition 33
[eh?54]KBD(uo)
Any Port In A Storm
[eh?53]Eckhard Gerdes
!Evil Scuff Mud
[eh?52]Psychotic Quartet
Sphaleron
[eh?51]Federico Barabino
Can You Listen To the Silence Between the Notes?
[eh?50]Soaf
Dynammo
[eh?49]Yana
The Fruit Witch of Ancient Salamander
[eh?48]Ember Schrag
Jephthah's Daughter
[eh?47]Massimo Falascone / Bob Marsh
Non Troppo Lontano
[eh?46]Delplanque / Oldman
Chapelle de l'Oratoire
[eh?45]The Epicureans
A Riddle Within a Conundrum Within a Game
[eh?44]Croatan Ensemble
Without
[eh?43]Man's Last Great Invention
None.
[eh?42]Sad Sailor
Link to the Outside World
[eh?41]Ricardo Arias / Miguel Frasconi / Keiko Uenishi
Object
[eh?40]Andreas Brandal
This Is Not For You
[eh?39]Gamma Goat
Beard of Sound, Beard of Sand
[eh?38]John Dikeman / Jon Barrios / Toshi Makihara
We Need You
[eh?37]David Moscovich
Ass Lunch
[eh?36]KBD
Four Plus One
[eh?35]Brekekekexkoaxkoax
I Manage To Get Out by a Secret Door
[eh?34]Diamondhead
Dirty Realism
[eh?33]Jesse Krakow
World Without Nachos
[eh?31]DBH
Wave the Old Wave
[eh?30]Bryan Day
Four Televisions
[eh?29]Giraffe
Hear Here
[eh?28]Nagaoag
Yama Labam A
[eh?27]Shelf Life
Rheuma
[eh?26]Papier Mache
2
[eh?25]Papier Mache
1


Patrick Shiroishi / Arturo Ibarra - LA Blues
C45 (Los Angeles)



Side A:
-Projection 8
-Projection 14

Side B:
-Projection 3
-Projection 58




Patrick Shiroisi - Alto Saxophone
Arturo Ibarra - Guitar

Reviews:
(Heavy Blog) Best Free Jazz of 2018. Saxophonist Patrick Shiroishi constantly puts out interesting and at times heart-wrenching releases. On this latest release, he’s joined by guitarist Arturo Ibarra to craft this fascinating album entitled LA Blues. The interplay between saxophone and guitar is highly emotional and at times quite deranging. I have an anecdote where a friend demanded me to stop playing this music because it gave them the same feeling as nails on a chalkboard. I found this quite amusing, and I reflected a bit on what is “good” and what is “bad”, and what is “music” and what isn’t… Well, at the end of my deliberations, I think this album is definitely good music. - Dave Tremblay

(Disaster Amnesiac) Hey there! It's been FAR too long since Disaster Amnesiac has posted anything. Suffice it to say, I've been very busy with other aspects of my life. That said, when Bryan Day comes a callin' with promo packages delivered to chez Amnesiac, I just have to get off of my butt and get to describing and enthusing. This brings me to 2018's LA Blues, a righteous duo set of Free Improvisation from Patrick Shiroishi and Arturro Ibarra. Keying off of lessons learned from Japanese guitarist Masayuki Takayanagi, Shiroishi and Ibarra set down some seriously locked in interplay for alto sax and electric guitar. Projection 8 sets the tone for the tape as the two wail and scream at all surrounding entities. It's very heavy, the way that their blasting tones leap right out of the gate, with zero letup for the duration. Upon first listen, Disaster Amnesiac was sure that the sax was a tenor, and this should show the raw power of Patrick's lungs! Arturo's guitar sounds wonderfully free of effects as he draws these giant chords from the strings. Side A's second track, Projection 14, starts off with a bit more space being given between the players as they chatter together. Eventually the conversation picks up steam as Ibarra and Shiroishi ramp up the energy. This one is based upon Takayanagi's concept of "gradual projection", and its somewhat more stated minimalist elements definitely show. When they start throwing the tones around, though....worth the wait for any Free Jazz fan. On the flip side, we get Projection 3, another gradual one on which Ibarra starts off with a cool line, over which Shiroishi floats some more of those lower notes on the alto. It's not long before the lines get more intertwined and the listener finds their ears following the fast ideas streaming forth, albeit in a slightly more restrained manner. Still, there's much sound to be digested as this duo gets down to the action of playing. A real sweet ending statement from Shiroisi, too. Last up is another "mass projection", much like LA Blues' opening track, Projection 58. As the liner note describes it, it's "...marked by bombast, [and] intensity...." Ibarra and Shiroishi slam and tear at the air on this one, with the former sounding especially keyed in to some higher directive. The latter responds accordingly, and the result is a feast of energetic, storming Free Jazz that splatters and coats the brain with delicious sonic colors. Let's face it, it takes some balls to call your release LA Blues. Putting your stuff on the level with the fabled Stooges skronk masterpiece should not be done lightly. Patrick Shiroishi and Artuo Ibarra rise to the challenge in ways that would surely put smiles on the faces of Steve Mackay and Ron Ashton. LA Blues delivers in much the same way as the song that it takes its name from did. Powerful stuff here. - Mark Pino

(Tabs Out) When I first heard that Patrick Shiroshi and Arturo Ibarra were going to mash together my two favorite songs by The Doors – “LA Woman” and “Roadhouse Blues” – I couldn’t believe my luck: instead of having to listen to TWO songs, I’d get a single tune with all the best parts of each. I wouldn’t have to wait for one track to end for the other to begin. Imagine my surprise, then, when “LA Blues” began to play and it wasn’t even REMOTELY what I thought it was going to be. However, instead of giving in to the brief flare of white hot rage that passed like an energy cloud across my consciousness, my humors quickly abated as if they were hit by a sudden cold front as I decided to give this a chance, regardless of how easily my foolish and completely misguided expectations had been dashed. The urge to chuck my cassette deck out of the second-floor window disappeared before I had the chance to yank it out of the wall. That’s not to say the music I was hearing wasn’t white hot. “Loosely inspired by the forms of Japanese guitarist Masayuki Takayanagi,” “LA Blues” from the get-go rends physical space like a swiftly fissioning star, finding alto saxophonist Shiroshi and guitarist Ibarra swirling about each other like primordial starstuff, their notes atoms trying to form bonds at velocities approaching light speed. Dangerous, dangerous stuff, and something you don’t want to get too close to if you find such things disturbing! Tracks 1 and 4, “Projection 8” and “Projection 58,” respectively, are “‘mass projections,’ marked by bombast, intensity, and a total disregard for anything approaching conventional melody or structure.” The Doors, or the idea of listening to them at this specific time, turned into Huxley’s actual “Doors of Perception” and flung themselves wide to welcome me into cosmic embrace of chaotic functionality. These performances masquerading as neutron bombs sandwich “Projection 14” and “Projection 3,” in which Shiroshi and Ibarra’s considered interplay is more readily apparent. But neither is a break or a reprieve, just a slower eruption of plasmic materials. The duo’s live takes are physical workouts, as if the players’ are lifting weights with their lips and fingers or running a marathon with their lips and fingers. Regardless, they probably have to sit down after a while to recuperate, let their lips and fingers slowly regain feeling again after all that energy expulsion. Not unlike Ray Manzarek after “The End.” Edition of 100 from Eh?/Public Eyesore. Not a lot left…


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